How He Makes a Home

We’ve lived here almost one year now… still living out of boxes.  Should I still feel like I’m living in a motel room?

It’s not my place to decorate or make wholesale change because, in a sense, I’m a guest.  I keep clean, keep safe and keep familiar the surroundings of the one we care for.

But what about the space we do occupy?

Last June we (and when I say we I mean the man and me) visited a son at his new home in Kentucky.

You wouldn’t think a single man with an army career would be such a homebody, especially as busy as he’s been the last 10 years…

… multiple combat tours to Afghanistan and Iraq, an instructor at Ranger school in Georgia, a deployment to Haiti right after the earthquake…

If anyone knows uncertainty, the fragile nature of life… I imagine it would be a combat soldier.  Yet during that time he bought and sold three homes.

He put down roots even knowing he would be deployed again and again… and again.

He took the time to paint the walls and hang the pictures, fill the bookshelves and make it be that comfy space called home… right down to the cowbell hanging on the front door.

He makes friends, wastes no time finding the nearest fishing hole, and his dogs love nothing better than to hunt the woods with him, then curl up at home.

His door is always open to family, friends and his soldiers.  He lives each day with purpose.  He doesn’t put things on hold until everything is “back to normal”… as I’m prone to do.

And he’s teaching me a lesson.

That very uncertainty of life seems to compel him to make a home base.  A safe place.  A recharging space.  It’s healthy and good.  And I need to do that.

I stashed a favorite painting behind the bedroom door when we arrived here.  I think it needs to see the light of day.  And perhaps I should dig a few family photos out of boxes to sprinkle about the room. 

Oh yes… I believe it’s time.

~ ~ ~ Rangers Lead The Way ~ ~ ~     thank you, my dear.

9 thoughts on “How He Makes a Home

  1. The only ‘temporary’ homes I’ve lived in were related to our college days — three years in a three-room college apartment, four months in a two-room, attached-to-the-church apartment during a summer appointment. They didn’t belong to us so we couldn’t paint walls or hammer nails into the walls. But we needed to make it home for the duration with our own curtains and bedspread in our bedroom, family photos and nick-nacks on window sills and fireplace mantels, cushions and afghans on couches. Yes, I’d say that young man had it right. Home is wherever you and your loved one(s) are, for however long or short term it may be. That painting of yours needs to be out where it can be seen. 🙂

    Like

  2. I love it when someone’s life makes such a vivid statement. “The very uncertainty of life compels him…” Good example for all of us in temporary rentals or for whatever reason. We do need roots. But I was just reading a gardening book, that perennials often do better when they are moved around. I think of them as permanent plantings. The author said they like to be moved. Hmmm, maybe there is a blog post there?? That those roots are not as permanent as I think. Thanks to your son, and to you for this lesson – blessings to your family!

    Like

  3. You have an amazing son and he has his heart at the right places with the right values. Truly admirable. “Tags
    home
    We’ve lived here almost one year now… still living out of boxes. Should I still feel like I’m living in a motel room?

    It’s not my place to decorate or make wholesale change because, in a sense, I’m a guest. I keep clean, keep safe and keep familiar the surroundings of the one we care for.

    But what about the space we do occupy?

    Last June we (and when I say we I mean the man and me) visited a son at his new home in Kentucky.

    You wouldn’t think a single man with an army career would be such a homebody, especially as busy as he’s been the last 10 years…

    … multiple combat tours to Afghanistan and Iraq, an instructor at Ranger school in Georgia, a deployment to Haiti right after the earthquake…

    If anyone knows uncertainty, the fragile nature of life… I imagine it would be a combat soldier. Yet during that time he bought and sold three homes.

    He put down roots even knowing he would be deployed again and again… and again.

    He took the time to paint the walls and hang the pictures, fill the bookshelves and make it be that comfy space called home… right down to the cowbell hanging on the front door.

    He makes friends, wastes no time finding the nearest fishing hole, and his dogs love nothing better than to hunt the woods with him, then curl up at home.

    His door is always open to family, friends and his soldiers. He lives each day with purpose. He doesn’t put things on hold until everything is “back to normal.” Thank you for sharing a wonderful post.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s